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MFHC Results Are Now Available!

Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 3.24.56 PMThank you for your participation at our 31st annual Music Festival in Honor of Confucius! We had a great group of competitors this year and all of them did a fantastic job!

The results are now available here: 2015 Music Festival In Honor of Confucius Winners.

If you have any other questions related to the competition, please email mfhc@chinesefinearts.org.

Thank you!

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Join CFAS for the First Installment of our “Eight Tones: An Exploration” Concert Series!

Date: Wednesday, October 28
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: Roosevelt University’s Ganz Hall (430 S. Michigan Ave, 7th Floor)
Cost: Free

3赵家萌

In a collaboration with Roosevelt University’s Chicago College for the Performing Arts, the Chinese Fine Arts Society will premiere its next concert series with the first installment – “Silk” – scheduled for October 28 at Roosevelt University’s Ganz Hall (430 S. Michigan Ave., 7th Floor) at 7:30PM. In an East-meets-West show, the concert will feature instrumentalists from both Roosevelt and the Shenyang Conservatory of Music, who will perform the evening’s repertoire on traditional Chinese stringed instruments (i.e. the erhu, pipa and guzheng). 

“Silk” is the first concert in a 2-year concert series titled “Eight Tones: An Exploration.” In traditional Chinese music, Eight Tones is an ancient classification system of traditional Chinese instruments, In Chinese music, the single tone is of greater significance than the melody. The tone is attributed to the substance that produces it, hence music instruments are categorized into eight tones classes by construction material: silk, bamboo, wood, stone, metal, clay, gourd or hide.

Making a rare appearance in the United States, the Shenyang Conservatory will bring a Kong Hou, an ancient instrument that dates back to the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220 AD) and was believed to have disappeared around the Mind Dynasty (1368-1644 AD). This harp-like instrument has two sets of strings that make a unique, resonant sound and allows the instrumentalist to play the melody and the accompanist piece simultaneously.

This show is free and open to the public. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

 

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